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Lake Pedder and Gordon Dam

Tasmanian World Heritage Area – the heart of Tasmanian wilderness.

Lake Pedder

Lake Pedder, once a natural lake, is a man-made impoundment and diversion lake located in the southwest of Tasmania, Australia. In addition to its natural catchment from the Frankland Range, the lake is formed by the 1972 damming of the Serpentine and Huon rivers by the Hydro Electric Commission of Tasmania for the purposes of hydroelectric power generation.

As a result, the flooded Lake Pedder now has a surface area of approximately 242 square kilometres (93 sq mi) and it is the largest freshwater lake in Australia.

The dams were designed and constructed by Tasmania's Hydro Electric Commission (HEC) as part of the Upper Gordon River hydro-electric generation scheme. The aim of this scheme was to increase Tasmania's capacity to generate hydro-electricity in accordance with the Tasmanian Government's policy of attempting to attract secondary industry to the State with the incentive of cheap renewable energy.

Take a good sealed road 150 kilometres west from Mt Field National Park to reach Lake Gordon and Lake Pedder, set in Tasmania's wild south-west wilderness and ringed with rugged mountain ranges.

Both lakes are a mecca for fishermen with some of the best trout fishing in the state.

Near Strathgordon is the mighty Gordon Dam, the the site of one of the world's highest commercial abseils, run by Aardvark Adventures.

Lake Pedder and its companion Lake Gordon, together comprise the largest inland freshwater storage in Australia, covering more than 500 square kilometres and holding more than 37 times the volume of water than Sydney Harbour.

When travelling to the Lake Pedder area please take suitable clothing to suit the changeable weather conditions. Weather conditions in Tasmania can change quickly and frequently, especially in mountain areas. Snow, rain, wind and sun are all possible at any time of the year.